Nate Tico – The Historic Balboa Theatre

Nate Tico – The Historic Balboa Theatre

The next portrait from an ongoing personal project.

Native Sons and Daughters is a photo series that tells a story of the people that live in the city that they grew up in. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

Nate is a 7th generation San Franciscan and is Vice President at Stars, the Agency. He chose The Historic Balboa Theatre for a portrait. The Balboa Theatre was originally built in 1926. In 2011, to help preserve one of the city’s last remaining neighborhood theaters, ownership of the theater transferred to the San Francisco Neighborhood Theater Foundation. The theater now operates under CinemaSF, which also runs the Vogue Theater. In 2013, the Balboa Theatre successfully completed a kickstarter campaign to convert its projectors from film to digital. As a gift for his donation, Nate has his name engraved on one of the seats inside the theater.

Special thanks to Adam Bergeron and Joel Goulet for allowing us inside the theater between showtimes for a photo.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Neighborhood he grew up in: “I grew up in the Outer Sunset on 41st Avenue and Lincoln. Right near Golden Gate Park and Ocean Beach. It was cool growing up so close to those special places. They were really my backyard. During summer vacation growing up we used to walk to the beach and swim in the ocean or climb trees and play stupid war games in the park almost daily. In retrospect it’s amazing how much fun could be had for free so close by. We’d also go the the ice skating rink on 48th avenue or play video games at the Musee’ Mechanique when it was still at The Cliff House. All that stuff was walking distance from where I lived.”

“My lineage goes back 7 generations in SF. Fernando Tico (my great great great great grandfather) was born in the Presidio in 1798 – no joke. My older brother did a tremendous amount of research and got all the documentation and family tree work gathered and it’s legit. It sounds ridiculous to tell people, yeah I’m a 7th generation San Franciscan. It will sound even more ridiculous for my nieces and nephews when they tell people they’re 8th generation.”

Neighborhood he lives in now: “Now I live in the Outer Richmond, about a 10 minute walk from where I grew up (didn’t make it far). Still near the beach and Golden Gate Park. Working in the crazy Union Square area for the last 17 years, it’s nice to come home to the relative quiet of the avenues. My wife and I enjoy walking to the little neighborhood places on Balboa and into the inner Clement area (Green Apple Books, etc.)”

Schools attended: “I went to Francis Scott Key Elementary, Herbert Hoover Middle School, George Washington High.”

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

The City continues to get inundated with people from everywhere. It’s been happening for as long as I can remember but nothing like this saturation. Many of my fellow native friends and family take it as a point of pride that we’re still here – living, working, growing older. This is our home. It’s where we were kids, where we played, where we had our first kiss. In some ways San Francisco is like our mother and father watching over us. Why should we have to be torn away from that because some hipster from Bumfuck, Iowa decides to move out here to ride a Google Bus and wait in long lines for new restaurants. I’m willing to work hard to stay. I like your project because half the people that have come here don’t even know there are any real natives (I mean born and raised in San Francisco). Thanks for helping remind people that we’re here – that we’ve been here.

I chose The Historic Balboa Theatre because I love movies and it’s my favorite movie theater in The City. I like the character it has. I used to cut class in high school and just walk down the street and watch a matinee. I’ve seen tons of movies there over the years. I like that it’s been there since 1926. In many ways it’s like a native itself and those multiplexes are the newbies to town. I like to support the Balboa because I enjoy seeing movies there and I want it to thrive. It’s a beautiful landmark for the area.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Back to Native Sons and Daughters

Previous Story

Next Story

Kevin – Marina Green


Kevin and Garvin

The next portrait from an ongoing personal project.

Native Sons and Daughters is a photo series that tells a story of the people that live in the city that they grew up in. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

I met Kevin about a year ago. Our daughters were entering the same Kindergarten class at our local elementary school. It was my first time as a Kinder parent but it was his third time around so it was great to chat and learn the ins and outs of what was going on. Of course, once we learned that we were both native San Franciscans the next immediate question was, “Where’d you go to school?” It turns out we both went to the same elementary and high school (St. Brigid, Lowell HS) and actually grew up less than a block away from each other in the Russian Hill neighborhood of San Francisco. He has a few years on me and so our paths never crossed, but we immediately bonded over our past experiences attending Catholic school and then public high school. Kevin chose to take his portrait with his dad, another native San Franciscan, at the Marina Green.


joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

  • Neighborhood his dad, Garvin, grew up in: Chinatown
  • Neighborhood his dad lives in now: Russian Hill
  • Schools attended: Commodore Stockton, Francisco Jr High, Polytechnic High School, Golden Gate University
  • Worked with the city for 36 years as accountant with the Water Department and Muni


joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

  • Neighborhood Kevin grew up in and lives in now: Russian Hill
  • Schools attended: St. Brigid, Lowell High School, UCLA


joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

San Francisco is the best place on earth. After living overseas post college I came back and felt like this was Oz.

I’ve lived overseas and traveled to over thirty countries in the world. There are many great cities out there… Paris, New York, Hong Kong, Sydney, Vancouver, London, Singapore, but nothing comes close to San Francisco.

I love the fact that you can be anything here and, for the most part, people accept you. I want my kids to work hard to be successful yet be compassionate toward those around us. One day I went with my kids to the local hardware store to get popcorn. They have it there for 25 cents. This particular day, the employee working there gave the kids the popcorn and let them keep the 25 cents. My oldest son asked me if he could do what he wanted with the quarter. When I said yes he walked over to a homeless guy and gave him the quarter. That made me feel happy, lucky, and proud all at the same time.

I chose the Marina Green for my portrait partly because of the beauty of the environment but really it is a place my father and I go for walks. After our walks we always say to each other, “Best part of the day.” I plan to walk there with my kids and hopefully, someday, my grandkids and great grandkids. hahaha!


joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Emily – Muni

Native Sons and Daughters is a personal project that tells a story of the people that live in the city that they grew up in. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

My good friend and coworker Emily chose to take a portrait on Muni – on the 22 Fillmore bus line.

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco joseph fanvu photography native san francisco joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

  • Neighborhood she grew up in: Richmond and Sunset
  • Neighborhood she lives in now: Duboce Triangle (in the middle of the Castro, Lower Haight, and the Mission)
  • Schools attended: Argonne Elementary, Herbert Hoover Middle, High School of the Arts, San Francisco State University, and Holy Names University

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

I’ve lived in San Francisco my entire life. All the time I’ve been in the city, it’s never made any sense to have a car. Try parking in my Duboce Triangle neighborhood. Pshh.

Public transit has always taken me to where I needed to go. So when asked to think of something that represented my life in the city, I thought of MUNI. Crazy MUNI. Ugh. As much as I complain about it (don’t we all?), it’s still a huge part of my life every day. I decided it would make sense to take some pictures on the 22 Fillmore. It’s my line. On its route from Potrero Hill to the Marina, it drops me off right at my boyfriend’s apartment, my apartment, my old apartment, my old church choir job, and my current church choir job.

So, here I am on my line, the 22, a little cramped and a little late, but knowing I’m still getting where I need to go.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Back to Native Sons and Daughters

Previous Story 

Next Story

Gary – Guardino’s at Fisherman’s Wharf

Native Sons and Daughters is a personal project that tells a story of the people that live in the city that they grew up in. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

To start off this project my good friend Gary chose Guardino’s at Fisherman’s Wharf – a place where he held his first job in high school.

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

  • Neighborhood he grew up in: Ingleside Terraces.
  • Neighborhood he lives in now: Ingleside Terraces.
  • Schools attended: St. Emydius and Holy Name Elementary Schools, Riordan High School, SF State, Golden Gate University

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

One of my favorite memories is working at Guardino’s. Guardino’s is a fish stand that is still there today at the corner of Jefferson and Taylor. I worked that job as a senior in high school. What I used to do is crack crab and sell clam chowder and french bread and calamari cocktails. I would not have been exposed to calamari if I didn’t have that job and I was exposed to it here in San Francisco. Same thing with the ice skating rink. I got turned on to the ice skating rink because we went to a [San Francisco] boys chorus party there. Who knew we had an ice skating rink here? That was on 48th and Lawton and that was a really great memory. I learned something that I thought was only done on the East Coast and that I only saw on TV. Later in college, I worked there for about 3 or 4 years as an ice guard. I still have my jacket. The rink is no longer there. They tore it down. There are apartments there now.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Back to Native Sons and Daughters

Next Story 

Family Portraits – San Francisco, CA

Some selections from a family portrait session. Sometimes the quickest way to get a reaction is to tell them they can dump leaves on your head.

san francisco, family photography, joseph fanvu san francisco, family photography, joseph fanvu san francisco, family photography, joseph fanvu san francisco, family photography, joseph fanvu