Katie Innes – Noe Valley/Sally Brunn Branch Library

Katie Innes – Noe Valley/Sally Brunn Branch Library

The next portrait from an ongoing personal project.

Native Sons and Daughters is a photo series that tells a story of the people that live in the city in which they grew up. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

Katie chose to take her portrait at the Noe Valley Branch Library. According to the SF Public Library website, this branch building opened in 1916 with a Spanish-style facade of brick and terra cotta. It was most recently renovated in 2008.

joseph fanvu photography san francisco 150318
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

I grew up in Noe Valley, back when there were barely any kids in the neighborhood. From there I traveled to the Mission to attend Children’s Day School, then Katherine Delmar Burke School in Sea Cliff, and finally the Urban School in the Haight. After four years away in Walla Walla, WA for college, I returned to SF to live in the Richmond, then the Castro, and now the Marina.

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

I chose the Noe Valley Library because I spent so much time there as a toddler at lapsit, as a kid eagerly participating in the summer reading program, as a teenager doing research for school papers, and as a recent college graduate trying to figure out what to do with my life. The building is nearly 100 years old and it’s so beautiful from the outside and inside. I always felt so lucky that it just happened to be a block from my house and that I could read and learn in such a historical space.

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

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Josh Workman – On Broadway sign, Broadway and Montgomery Sts.

Josh Workman – On Broadway sign, Broadway and Montgomery Sts.

The next portrait from an ongoing personal project.

Native Sons and Daughters is a photo series that tells a story of the people that live in the city in which they grew up. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

Josh chose to take his portrait with the On Broadway sign located at Broadway and Montgomery Sts. According to its website, the building was constructed in 1919 as “Garibaldi Hall” an Italian Men’s Club. Since that time, it has been used as an events venue and among others has been the home of Mabuhay Gardens, On Broadway Theater, and Broadway Studios. To see an early photo of this building and read about the impressive list of acts to play here, go to the website at http://broadwayvenue.com/?page_id=39

With the help of the ownership, we were able to get the lights turned on for his portrait. (some of the lights at least) Since we weren’t able to get inside, we took some more shots in the alley adjacent to the club.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

I moved around the city quite a bit when I was a kid. We began out in the Excelsior, hit Glen Park for a few years, migrated to Noe Valley, out to the Sunset then back to a couple of spots in Noe Valley again. My father, Bill Workman, wrote for the SF Chronicle. My mother, Sanna Craig, wrote for Mother Jones and other publications.

Since I moved around a bit while growing up, I jumped from school to school, as well. My grammar schools were Longfellow, Glen Park, and Lakeshore. I attended Aptos Middle School, went to Lowell High for two years then graduated from McAteer/School of the Arts (SOTA).

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

My stepfather’s family home since the 1950s, located on Pacheco near 30th Avenue in the Sunset district, has been “command-central” for quite a few years now. I work in music production as a composer, arranger, and sound editor on the Peninsula several days a week, teach in Marin, and perform on guitar in San Francisco and other cities around the Bay Area. I love being able to walk down to Ocean Beach and feel the mist on my face or simply stand out in front of the house and watch the Sun disappear behind the mighty Pacific. Equally enjoyable is being able to walk or run around the reservoir, just up the hill from the house and catty-corner from Lincoln High School, which is where my stepfather graduated from.

 

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

 

I picked the On Broadway sign located at 435 Broadway street which is now the home of Broadway Studios. It is so iconic and it bookends Broadway st. with The Condor sign on the other end. My first band spent countless nights on Broadway, playing in little dives, such as The Chi-Chi Club and Mabuhay Gardens, also known as The Fab Mab. We sometimes had to hide in the back room of the Chi-Chi when the cops would come around, since we were way underage. The owner, Miss Keiko, used to come down and hear us play and I remember a faded picture of Eddie Money that they had proudly displayed on their front window. I guess he had played there in the early days. I also remember showing up to play a matinee show at the On Broadway once when I was about fifteen but it had caught fire the night before and so it was boarded up.

After living for seven years in Boston and New York, I moved back to San Francisco and spent many more nights playing on Broadway during the Swing Revival of the 1990s with Indigo Swing. I ended up marrying Nicole Vigil, the second singer in that band! I also used to play at the Hi Ball Lounge, which had been home to the legendary Jazz Workshop from the late ’50s to late ’60s. I still play at various spots in North Beach but the music scene just isn’t the same as it once was on the actual Broadway strip. Funny enough, back in the 1960s, my stepdad Larry Vuckovich spent six nights a week playing at the Hungry I, which is still located on Broadway.

 

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Edith Salvatore – 17th Hole, Lincoln Golf Course

Edith Salvatore – 17th Hole, Lincoln Golf Course

The next portrait from an ongoing personal project.

Native Sons and Daughters is a photo series that tells a story of the people that live in the city in which they grew up. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

Edith chose to have her portrait at the Lincoln Park Golf Course at the 17th Hole. Lincoln Park Golf Course, named after President Lincoln, is known by locals for its reasonable fees but also for its majestic views of the Pacific Ocean and Golden Gate Bridge. Golf has been played at this San Francisco location since 1902 and expanded into a full 18-hole course in 1917.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

I grew up in the Outer Richmond, right on the Geary bus line. This is why I think I hardly ever feel earthquakes – my bedroom shook every fifteen-to-twenty minutes from the bus passing by my whole childhood. I’m used to it! With the exception of the three years I lived on campus at UC Santa Cruz, I have never left my zip code – my childhood was spent on Geary and 35th and I attended all neighborhood schools – Lafayette Elementary on Anza, Presidio Middle School on 30th, and Washington High School. My first grown-up apartment was on 34th and Clement, followed by a flat on Fulton and now a house out by the beach on 45th. I am a fan of the fog, Chinese food, and ample parking – who could ask for anything more?

I loved growing up in the Richmond District – it had all the advantages of the City (diversity, great food, Golden Gate Park, Ocean Beach, easy access to City attractions via Muni) while retaining some suburban appeal of decent parking and parks and playgrounds. When I found out I was pregnant with triplets, I hoped to be able to raise them in that same environment and, so far, I have. I love that they squeal for the bridge whenever they catch a glimpse of it out a car window or see it depicted on a sign and that they think their house is called “San Francisco”. A second generation of “natives” who love where they’re growing up!

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

I chose the tee and green at the 17th hole of the Lincoln Park Golf Course because I have always considered this my secret spot to impress tourists. Whenever anyone came to visit and we took them for a drive around town, we’d make sure to stop by and show them this “secret” perfect view of the Golden Gate Bridge. In school, we would walk our dog down to Lincoln Park, down the hidden walkway along the side of the golf course, and across El Camino del Mar to run around at the vista point (which has changed so much over the past four decades!)

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

It’s also a great spot to see fireworks without the crowds of the waterfront. Of course, that is subject to San Francisco weather. I remember being told the story growing up that in the summer of 1976, when my younger brother was just two weeks old, my father took me out to this spot to watch the big bi-centennial fireworks in typical July fog. While my mother and the baby stayed home and watched spectacular fireworks on TV, my father held me on his shoulders as I oohed and ahhed at the “pink fog” and “green fog” and “blue fog”. Growing up in the Outer Richmond, that’s what fireworks are supposed to look like, right?

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

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SFGC Group Photo 2014

Just a fun little gif of how we put together our final group photo this year.

SFGC Group photo San Francisco

Sabrina Adler – The War Memorial Opera House

Sabrina Adler – The War Memorial Opera House

The next portrait from an ongoing personal project.

Native Sons and Daughters is a photo series that tells a story of the people that live in the city that they grew up in. Each subject chooses a portrait location that is meaningful to them in some way and represents their own connection to the city.

Sabrina, a 2nd generation San Franciscan (and 4th generation Bay Area native), chose the Opera House for a portrait. The War Memorial Opera House was completed in 1932. It was the first publicly funded opera house in the United States. Since it’s opening it has been the home of the San Francisco Opera. Along with Louise M. Davis Symphony Hall and Herbst Theatre it is a part of the San Francisco War Memorial And Performing Arts Center. Sabrina’s father, Kurt Herbert Adler, served as General Director for the San Francisco Opera from 1953 until 1981.

Special thanks to Jon Finck, Director of Communications and Public Affairs at SF Opera, for helping us gain access inside.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Neighborhood she grew up in: “Cow Hollow, then Marin (Ross), then back to Cow Hollow.”

Neighborhood she lives in now: “Duboce Triangle (but I’ve also lived in Noe Valley, the Mission, and the Castro).”

Schools attended: “Ross School (in Marin), Burke’s (for part of middle school), and University High School.”

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

Sabrina in front of her father’s bust.

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

I chose the opera house because it was such an important part of my childhood. I spent a lot of time there growing up. Even though my dad retired as General Director of SF Opera when I was a toddler, he continued to conduct and work on other projects there, so we would attend a lot of rehearsals and performances. I used to pretend that the lobby was my own personal palace when I was really young. When I got a bit older and joined the San Francisco Girls Chorus, I was fortunate enough to perform on stage in several operas (Wozzeck, Boris Godunov, La Boheme, and Macbeth). I always loved being backstage and spending time at rehearsals and in our dressing rooms. During high school, I worked for the Merola Program one summer, which brought me to the Opera House for various projects. Then, when I was in college, I spent a summer interning in the Artistic Administration department. Most of the time I was in the offices upstairs, but I also got the chance to sit through some tech rehearsals and watch other things happen behind the scenes. Now I’m usually at the Opera house during performances, as an audience member, or for dress rehearsals. But I still have so many fond memories of all my time spent there, in so many different capacities, that it seemed like a fitting place to take photos. It’s particularly meaningful to me given the connection with my dad and the role he played in civic life in San Francisco, mostly before I was born!

joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco
joseph fanvu photography native san francisco

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